Community. Sustainability. Originality. These terms help define the craft beer movement.

One way breweries have been espousing these principals is by rehabilitating historic buildings and repurposing them into breweries. It seems only fitting that craft brewers are often the ones revitalizing the past. After all, the craft beer boom has helped America get in touch with its pre-industrial roots when local artisans hand-crafted items largely used by those within the local community.

Argus Brewery, Chicago, Illinois

– in a Stable

Argus brewery is located in the historic Pullman district of Chicago. George Pullman helped transform passenger travel on railways. However, Argus is attached to an even older form of transportation – horses. The Argus brewery was once an early 1900s stable for Joseph E. Schlitz, as seen by two terra cotta horse heads that adorn the front of the building.

Argus Brewery

Argus Brewery

Photo Courtesy of Mathew Powers

Atlas Brewing, Chicago, Illinois

– in a Potato Chip Factory

Like Mission, Atlas resurrected the name of a pre-Prohibition brewery. They recently moved into the Jay’s Potato Chip factory – a big part of Chicago’s history. Co-owner Ben Saller says, “Our company was founded by lifelong Chicagoans. We were excited to set up shop in a space with that kind of history. We would much rather make use of an unused building than build something new.”

Atlas Brewing Exterior View

Atlas Brewing Exterior View

Photo Courtesy of Mathew Powers

Brewer’s Alley Brewpub, Frederick County, Maryland

– in a Former City Hall/Opera House

The Brewer’s Alley name and location enjoys a long history that began in the 1760s. The city replaced the original building in 1873 with the current structure where Brewer’s Alley resides. The beer stopped flowing in 1901, but the new Brewer’s Alley revived the name in 1996. During the hiatus, the site played host to a city hall, farmer’s market, opera house and theater.

Brewers Alley Outside View and Terrace

Brewers Alley Outside View and Terrace

Photo Courtesy of Stacy Cashman at RamblingTraveler.com

The Church Brew Works, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

– in a Church

The backbone of many communities is their church, so it’s fitting that at least one brewery converted an old church into a brewery. The brick and mortar dates back to 1902, but the history of the parish started in the 19th century. A time capsule, which details the area and church’s history, is located in the building’s cornerstone. Meanwhile, old confessional bricks were used for the pillars of an outdoor sign and a facade for both a ramp and kitchen.

Church Brew Works Overhead View of Dining Room

Church Brew Works Overhead View of Dining Room

Photo Courtesy of Church Brew Works
Church Brew Works Still

Church Brew Works Still

Photo Courtesy of Church Brew Works

Firehouse Brewing, Rapid City, South Dakota

– in a Firehouse

The personification of community exists in its civil servants. Firehouse Brewing celebrates the community’s 100-year history of firefighting by residing in a firehouse that was built in 1915. As their website explains, “[The] bar is adorned with authentic South Dakota firefighting memorabilia from the days of Rapid City’s first fire brigades, including the original fire pole, ladders, patches and more.” It’s also a community cultural center, hosting theater performances on the second floor.

Firehouse Brewing Front Entrance

Firehouse Brewing Front Entrance

Photo Courtesy of Firehouse Brewing

Huske Hardware House Restaurant & Brewery, Fayetteville, North Carolina

– in a Hardware Store

The Huske family represented North Carolina as delegates during the ratification of the U.S. Constitution and fought in the Civil War, Spanish-American War and WWI. “Major” Huske opened the large, full service hardware store in Fayetteville around the turn of the century, which was converted to a brewery and restaurant in 1998.

Huske Hardware House Front Entrance

Huske Hardware House Front Entrance

Photo Courtesy of Hannah Pascucci – TravelingVA

Loop Brewing Co, McCook, Nebraska

– in a Warehouse

Loop Brewery transformed one of McCook’s oldest buildings – roughly 100 years old – from a warehouse into a brewery. However, Loop’s website notes the building’s original purpose was housing ice for the residents of McCook and keeping “perishables and great tasting beer cold to and from Chicago.”

Loop Brewery Exterior View

Loop Brewery Exterior View

Photo Courtesy of Loop Brewing

Mission Brewery, San Diego, California

– in the Wonder Bread Building

In addition to reviving the name of a local brewery that went defunct during Prohibition, they are located in the historic Wonder Bread building that was, according to their website, “built in 1894 and has the architectural bones of the original design with wood work that cannot be duplicated today.”

Mission Brewing - Wonder Bread Building

Mission Brewing – Wonder Bread Building

Photo Courtesy of Mission Brewing
Mission Brewery Guest Enjoying

Mission Brewery Guest Enjoying

Photo Courtesy of Mission Brewing

Phantom Canyon Brewing Company, Colorado Springs, Colorado

– in a Former Hotel

Phantom Canyon is located in the historic Cheyenne Hotel, built in 1901, and named after both the Cheyenne Mountain and Chief Two Moons of the Cheyenne Indian Tribe. Nearly 25 years ago, the building was set to be demolished, but the brewery moved in, thus saving the old hotel and a piece of history.

Phantom Canyon

Phantom Canyon

Photo Courtesy of Both photos are from Paul Sableman, Flickr
Phantom Canyon Chief Two Moons Figure

Phantom Canyon Chief Two Moons Figure

Photo Courtesy of Both photos are from Paul Sableman, Flickr