With the colder weather upon us, it’s time to enjoy a warm and boozy cocktail.

The Romans are credited as the first to heat wine and other cultures have joined in, creating their own adaptations of mulled wine.

Glogg, a traditional Swedish mulled wine, is known for being served at parties throughout the holiday season. Chef Emma Bengtsson, at Aquavit restaurant, is serving her guests a drink with vodka, orange juice, star anise, cardamom, cinnamon, and red port wine. Combining all ingredients in a pot, letting simmer and stirring occasionally, the glogg then rests of two hours before straining. Unlike traditional mulled wine, almonds and raisins are put in the glass before the glogg is poured over.

Glühwein, which translates to glow-wine, is popular among Germans and Austrians. Hütte, a restaurant on the Upper East Side is offering guests to dine in the tented backyard space, molded after an Aprés Ski Lounge. Guests can have a hot drink and warm up with blankets. The drink is made with dry red wine, cinnamon, herbs, and spices. It also has a pumpkin spice flavor for a fall twist.

Glogg

Glogg

Glogg

Ingredients:

  • 1 spice sachet (1/2 cup raisins, 2 dried figs, 3 cardamom pods, 2 cinnamon sticks, 5 cloves, 1 star anise)
  • 1 bottle red wine
  • 1 cup vodka
  • 1 cup port wine
  • 1 orange, juiced and rind
  • 1 cup raw sugar or light brown sugar

Preparation: Place spice sachet in a large pot and add in all ingredients. Heat to a simmer, then turn it off and let it steep for an hour. Ladle into a cup (3oz) and top with slivered almonds and raisins.


Pumpkin Spice Glühwein

Pumpkin Spice Glühwein

Pumpkin Spice Glühwein

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup water
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 cup orange juice
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • 3 pieces star anise
  • 20 pieces cloves
  • 1 bottle (750ml) red wine
  • 2 tbsp. pumpkin pie spice

Preparation: Combine all ingredients and cook over medium heat for 2 hours, below 170° F or the wine will cook off. Take off heat and let it stand for 1 hour before straining.