In certain parts of the country every day is Rosé day, as the pale pink liquid flows freely from sunrise to sunset and beyond during the summer months.

Yet somehow it took Swedes to officially launch National Rosé Day in the United States when Swedish Rosé house Bodvár, introduced National Rose day back in 2014. Americans have been raising a glass to this summer staple ever since.

The category has seen tremendous growth over the past years and what used to be associated with the “ladies who lunch,” has grown into the fastest growing wine type in the U.S. according to Vivino data. Long gone are the days when the only  “good” rose is produced in Provence, France and the popular American 80’s favorite, White Zinfandel, was referred to as “American Rosé” with an epic eyeroll.

Santa Margharita Rosé

Santa Margharita Rosé

Today you can find great rosé made all over the world and they vary in style depending on the territory, grapes and winemaker. They can be a pale salmon color or a deep pink, minerally with crisp notes or lush and fruity with a floral finish. That being said, like all wines, some rosés are better than others and the increased demand for this summer favorite has resulted in an influx of what some consider to be lower quality rosé wines where the focus is on cute labels, catchy names, and beautiful Instagram accounts rather than the wine itself. It can sometimes be hard to pick through the clutter to find your gem. So to celebrate national rosé day this year we suggest a sparkling rosé rather than a still. Because who doesn’t love bubbles to celebrate?

Start the toast with a perfect example of a well-made sparkling rosé that is both classic and elegant—G.H Mumm Cordon Rosé.  This Brut Rosé Champagne (Champagne is a sparkling wine made to time-honored standards in Champagne, France) is perfectly dry with hints of summer fruits and has a long savory finish. It’s a refreshing and lively blend of Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Pinot Meunier with 14 % distinctive and bold red Pinot Noir wines sourced from some of Champagne’s most prestigious villages thus giving it that beautiful pale salmon pink. Another nice service bonus; the label-less bottle stays fresh and looks great when entrenched in ice.

G.H.Mumm Grand Cordon Rosé

G.H.Mumm Grand Cordon Rosé

If Italian is more your thing there are some great Vino Spumantes that come in the pink variety. Santa Margherita has become a household name thanks to their Pinot Grigio, so offer up their Rosé Sparkling for a fresh and floral fizz that guests will be familiar with. It features a blend of Glera (the grape of prosecco), Chardonnay and Malbec resulting in a vibrant and well rounded sparkling Rosé that works well with savory appetizers to start off a meal.

Speaking of Italy, there is some good news for that Prosecco lover at your bar; the Italian government has finally given the go ahead for the production of pink Prosecco so expect to see some of these popping up next spring.

Jwines

Jwines

If you want to keep your pink bubble tasting to  this side of the pond, J Vineyards & Winery, located in California’s Russian River is known for their fine sparkling wines and their Brut Rosé is no exception. The wine is produced in the Traditional Method and they utilize low-pressure pressing to minimize the breakdown of grape skins and seeds. The result is a beautiful effervescent sparkling with a creamy and delicate mouthfeel. The color is that pinkish-salmon color, which just begs for a top off in the glass.