A single glass of wine is typically priced at the wholesale cost of the entire bottle.

That means that a bottle that costs $10 wholesale equates to a $10 glass of wine at your bar or restaurant. Your markup depends on how many glasses you pour from the bottle.

Our job at Chilled is to suggest wines for your wine-by-the-glass bar program. Each online issue will highlight a handful of wines that meet our criteria of quality and affordability. The wines chosen will please the palate on their own or when served with food. This week, we’re discussing the best wines by the glass to offer at seafood restaurants.

Choosing a wine to complement seafood is an easy task, as long as you know the characteristics of the seafood. Some fish, like salmon, is high in fat content, while other seafood, like oysters, are packed full of salty brine. A grilled swordfish is much weightier than a piece of poached perch, while a piece of raw tuna sashimi will need a different wine pairing then a plate of fried calamari. They all require a distinct style of wine to balance the taste.

General ideas for seafood and wine pairings begin with salmon, possibly the most commonly sold fish in restaurants in this country. With its high oil content, generally an oaked Chardonnay, a Pinot Gris, or a California Pinot Noir (which is also great for mackerel) can stand up to fish with stronger flavors. The sheer weight of these wines also tames the oily backbone of the fish.

For freshly shucked oysters, you want unoaked, crisp, and sparkling wines. Champagne method wines are always a perfect pairing, as well as New Zealand Sauvignon Blancs or a Picpoul from southern France. If you are uncertain about what wine to suggest, always recommend a bottle of Brut Champagne method wine. Sparkling wine will be the best bet for a table of seafood diners who have different entrees.

If you’re not looking for specific bottles, these general guidelines should help you get started. Albariño, Verdelho, and Sauvignon Blanc are all great with shellfish—think mussels, clams, scallops, and lobster. Sangiovese goes perfectly with octopus and clams cooked in red sauce. Tomato-based seafood soups and tuna love rosés. Shrimp is a perfect match for Vinho Verde, as the pairing is like adding a squirt of lemon juice to the crustacean, and Arneis and Moscato both pair well with garlic shrimp. Crabs, anchovies, and sardines favor dry Rieslings. And Pinot Gris brightens sea bass.

If you’re looking for specifics, here are six of our favorite wines by the glass to serve at seafood restaurants.

Cecchi La Mora Vermentino 2017

This Vermentino is made on the Tuscan southwest Mediterranean coast in Maremma. The region is referred to as “The California of Italy” and the home of roaming cowboys on horseback. This wine’s profile falls between stainless Chardonnay and Pinot Gris, highlighted by tropical fruits, mature pulp, and minerality. The profile makes this Tuscan gem a true seafood wine.

Suggested glass price: $12

Cecchi La Mora Vermentino 2017, bottle on white

Cecchi La Mora Vermentino 2017


Loveblock Sauvignon Blanc 2018

Certified organic and grown in alluvial soil on hilltops overlooking Marlborough Awatere Valley, this New Zealand white focuses on texture rather than enhanced aromas. On the palate, the wine is loaded with hints of sweet basil, pineapple, peach, and tropical fruit. A chalky, complex minerality complements the fruit and makes this a standout for fresh oysters and seafood.

Suggested glass price: $14

Loveblock Sauvignon Blanc 2018, bottle on white

Loveblock Sauvignon Blanc 2018


Boutari Oropedio 2017

Boutari Oropedio is a wine from Greece’s southern Mantinia region. It is made from the indigenous Moschofilero varietal, which grows at a height of 2,500 feet and is protected by the mountains as it develops. At their peak, the grapes are handpicked, then matured for a short time in oak barrels. This process gives this white wine its finesse, and it exhibits aromas of honey, chamomile, grapefruit, and white roses. It’s an extremely food-friendly wine and perfect to pair with crab, oysters, shellfish, and seafood prepared with Asian ingredients.

Suggested glass price: $14

Boutari Oropedio 2017, bottle on white

Boutari Oropedio 2017


Statti Greco 2017

This wine is a 100 percent Greco white from Italy’s southern Calabria region. The grape is similar to Malvasia and produces a weighty wine with hints of juicy citrus, kiwifruit, basil, white peach, and smoky tea. The finish highlights creamy, roasted almonds. This wine can stand up to all types of seafood dishes that feature shellfish, pasta with sauce, or risotto.

Suggested glass price: $11

Statti Greco 2017, bottle on white

Statti Greco 2017


Poggio la Noce Gigetto 2016

Gigetto is a Tuscan red wine made up of 90 percent Sangiovese and blended with Canaiolo and Colorino. It’s an easy-drinking, certified organic wine that loves seafood with red sauce, such as clams, shrimp, and octopus. This small vineyard, run by husband and wife team Enzo and Claire, has won many prestigious awards and should be on your radar.

Suggested glass price: $12

Poggio la Noce Gigetto 2016, bottle on white

Poggio la Noce Gigetto 2016


Bellussi Cuvée Prestige

This sparkling Italian Pinot Noir has enough dryness and finesse to light up numerous types of seafood. Line up the oysters, shrimp, lobster, and crab for this universal wine that should be your choice for a table of customers with different seafood dishes. On its own, as an aperitif with seafood appetizers, or after the meal, this sparkling wine delivers.

Suggested glass price: $14

Bellussi Cuvée Prestige, bottle on white

Bellussi Cuvée Prestige