Cynar (pronounced CHEE-nar) is a commonly overlooked, botanical forward spirit that is finally making some waves in the American bar scene.

Cynar 70 Proof, artichokes and bottle

Cynar 70 Proof

Initially concocted in Italy in the 1950s, this unique offering showcases world-famous Italian bitters. Cynar is comprised of a multitude of herbs and plants, including its namesake and primary ingredient, the mighty artichoke. The result is a so-called digestivo, a semi-medicinal after dinner beverage that is surprisingly delightful in many cocktails. Cynar is noteworthy for its bittersweetness that is somehow both approachable and invigorating.

Here’s what inventive bartenders, from the Big Apple to the Big Easy, are doing with the one-of-a-kind ingredient of Cynar.

Can I Borrow Some Eggs? cocktail on bar

Can I Borrow Some Eggs?

Can I Borrow Some Eggs?

Created by Dean Fuerth, Chumley’s, New York City

Ingredients:

  • 2 oz. Pisco
  • 1 oz. lemon juice
  • 3/4 oz. honey syrup (1:1, honey:water)

Preparation: Shake all with ice. Pour into large flute filled with crushed ice and float Cynar on top.


Fragola Colada at Arnaud's, cocktail with strawberry and herb

Fragola Colada

Fragola Colada

Created by Christoph Dornemann, Arnaud’s French 75 Bar, New Orleans

  • 1 oz. Plantation Overproof
  • 1/2 oz. Cynar
  • 1 1/2 oz. Strawberry Coco Magic
  • 1/2 oz. passion fruit syrup

Preparation: Shake and strain into crushed ice-filled Collins glass.

Garnish: Mint sprig, strawberry slice, and grated cocoa.


Tommy Cueball, cocktail with grapefruit garnish

Tommy Cueball

Tommy Cueball 

Created by Will Wyatt, Pretty Ricky’s, New York City

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 oz. Cynar
  • 1/4 oz. cold brewed coffee
  • 3/4 oz. sweet vermouth
  • 1 1/2 oz. fresh grapefruit juice
  • 1 pinch of salt

Preparation: Whip shake one cube until cube is completely gone. Pour (don’t strain) over ice in a rocks glass.